Deluge of Atlantis

Deluge of Atlantis
Deluge of Atlantis

Friday, January 16, 2015

Possible Direct Evidence for the Atlantis Invasion

I had this map prepared to illustrate the results of the Atlantis Empire invasion that Plato was talking about, but while I had it in storage the text was lost. However these are the two sites that are marked with an asterisk and which seem to indicate the results of a violent invasion at the end of the Ice Age. In the New World the effects are less obvious archaeologically but there are clear signs that the male side of the descendants came from a transatlantic R Y-DNA group that replaced whatever older males that might have been present in the older populations.

The middle aged Sicilian woman was struck by arrows from the side
 about 10000 years ago during the Epipaleolithic (reconstruction at the local museum)

Skeletons-from-Jebel-Sahaba-Sahara,  two victims of the massacre of at least 24 people at the same time in a conflict between two distinct ethnic groups and which resulted in the introduction of a new farming and herding economy at the end of the last Ice Age

Two late Paleolithic (Epigravettian at ca 11000 BC) bodies of this kind are known from Italy. One, from San Teodoro cave in Sicily, was a woman with a flint point in her right iliac crest. This artifact was designed as a triangle and was most probably an arrow point. The other was a child with a flint in its thoracic vertebra, found in late Epigravettian layers of the Grotta dei Fanciulli (the famous Grotte des Enfants) at Balzi-Rossi / Grimaldi, on the LIgurian Italian / French border.
The most remarkable discovery of late Paleolithic Age comes from Jebel Sahaba, a few kilometers north of Wadi Halfa on the east bank of the Nile. A graveyard (ca 10000 BC) containing 59 burials was located on a hill overlooking the Nile. Twenty-four skeletons had flint projectile points that were either embedded in the bones or found within the grave fill in positions which indicated they had penetrated the bodies. The excavator of the site, Fred Wendorf (The prehistory of Nubia, II p. 991) wrote: ” The most impressive feature is the high frequency of unretouched flakes and chips. In a normal assemblage all of these would be classified as debitage or debris and none would considered tools. Yet many of these pieces were recovered from positions where their use as parts of weapons were irrefutable”. joteIn total, more than 40% of the men, woman and children in the commentary had died by violence.  Fred Wendorf, suggested that environmental pressure and vanishing resources on the end of the Pleistocene were the causes of violence, but this remains only one hypothesis. A detailed analysis of the skeletons with nowadays methods (dna-analysis, stable isotopes) is missing till now. If war is defined as organized aggression between autonomous social units, the archaeological record at Jebel Sahaba may indeed indicate the presence of an early war.
Coming back to the European Record, at Ofnet cave in Bavaria two pits contained the skulls and vertebrae of thirty-eight individuals, all stained with red ochre, dating to around 8-9000 BC (Orschiedt 1998). The Ofnet finding most probably represents a massacre, which wiped out a whole community and was followed by the ceremonial burial of skulls. Most of the victims of deadly attacks were children; two-thirds of the adults were females, which led to the suggestion, that a temporary absence of males may have been the precipitating cause of the attack. Half the individuals were wounded before death by blunt mace-like weapons, with males and females and children all injured, but males having the most wounds.
 
(The dates are not all the same but they are all in the same ballpark
 and they all do represent the same cultural level-DD)

 http://www.aggsbach.de/2011/05/lethal-conflicts-in-paleolithic-and-mesolithic-societies/

And at least in the Sudan we know what their boats looked like (from Wikipedia but Charles Berlitz also mentions the situation)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cemetery_117
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/saharan-remains-may-be-evidence-of-first-race-war-13000-years-ago-9603632.html
http://www.archaeologyuk.org/ba/ba52/ba52feat.html
http://archive.archaeology.org/9705/newsbriefs/archers.html
http://www.academia.edu/3545293/Reconsidering_the_Mesolithic_and_Neolithic_of_Sudan
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nile_boat

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