Deluge of Atlantis

Deluge of Atlantis
Deluge of Atlantis

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

The Story of Easter

Carolyn Rose Goyda, a Facebook Friend of Mine, sent me a copy of this yesterday and I posted it to my timeline:



And I added, "And the direct derivation of Easter is from the European Goddess of Spring Oestra, also pronounced about like Ishtar, and from which we get the word Oestrus (Estrus)-when an animal gets into heat. And Oestra is also associated with rabbits and eggs."

But then Kyle Germann added "That might be Lilith" and "She might be the First Vampire"

So I elaborated, "Actually the picture is regularly called that. BUT Lilith might only be a form of Ishtar. Ishtar was also sacrificed by her sister Ereshkigal AND this could be Ereshkigal AND Ereshkigal could ALSO be the same as Ishtar. Its complicated. But the fact that she died-and-came-back is part of the same Goddess of Spring story, which is the same story as Snow White (who sleeps over the Winter) and Sleeping Beauty (Everything blossoms back into life when she wakes up again) http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/ereshkigal

And the Classical Goddess of Spring story is another resurrection story, the one attached to Persephone, who is taken down to Hades but returns each spring
http://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/myth-of-hades-and-persephone/

 

 
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/Persephone.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persephone
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ishtar
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ereshkigal

But the notice sent in by Carolyn was a little too simplistic, the death-burial-and-resurrection was already an integral part of the ancient myths, and the return to life meant the return of fertility to the land. The story is also a good marker for cultural diffusion.

10 comments:

  1. Etymology online says Easter is from PIE *aus "to shine". Do you think Ishtar is also from PIE?

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  2. Since in Indian Languages "Tara" means "Star", I think you can make a reasonable guess that *Aus+Tara = Shining Star. That does not account for the Semetic "Ishtar" (and ewventually our word "Star")unless it was a loan-word: my guess is that it was and it was applied to the Sumerian Inanna at the time the Gutium (Indo-Europeans) were in control. That suggestion will doubtless startle several Assyriologists. I understand there is also a PIE word for the Morning Star and its deity is held to be the same as the Classical Aphrodite (Venus) although both of those more familiar names would be derived independantly.

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  3. thank you. Aish in Hebrew is fire (sounds like aus). Ancient Semites thought that above the dome of heaven (firmament) was pure fire. What about tara? Could it be Atar; Aramaic for "some place".

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  4. Although "Some place of fire" sounds as if it might work, I think the Indo-European is a better fit and it would be a loan word.

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  5. Dear Mr Dale,
    This is interesting and concurs with the Mother goddess principles of the Hindu Pantheon. Ishtar sounds like Ishta, which means desire in Sanskrit. Therefore Ishtar is one who grants the desires and the wishes of people. This goes well with the arrival of spring, when people come out and look for fulfilling their wishes.

    The image of Ishtar is a later derivation from Ashera. If the information in this link is true, then Ashera is a derivation or an adaptation of Amba or Durga of Hindu Thought who is the consort of Lord Shiva.

    http://thequeenofheaven.wordpress.com/2010/10/27/asherah-part-i-the-lost-bride-of-yahweh/

    The Jewish depiction of Ashera under the tree or as a tree or in company of snakes is nothing but an adaptation of the worship of Durga and snake god in India. You would see a similar image of Durga under a tree and snake worship under the tree in thousands of places in India, particularly in South India. Ashera with Baal and their story is similar to Durga / Parvathy with her son Baala Muruga (popularly known as Skanda).

    The amulet like things in Ishtar's hand is similar to "Paasa" in Kaali's hand. In Sanskrit Paasa means 'noose' with which this deity is said to destroy the evil ones. The owls and tigers are connected with Goddess 'Kaali'. In Mahabharata, after the Kauravas were killed by the Pandavas, Ashwatthama decided to take revenge on them. He got the idea for the strategy by observing owls which attacked the enemies at night. He immediately sprang into action and destroyed the people of the opposite camp in their sleep. That night was described as "Kaala-raathri" - the horrible night of Kaali, when death and destruction danced like Kaali herself. The image of owls along with Ishtar reminds me this.

    Tigers were Kaali's mode of transportation. The Ishtar has all the features of Kaali. However the same Kaali, when appeased well, fulfills their wishes. In each kind of role, the name changes and also some of the accessories. But the basic accessories or attendants remain in all manifestations. May be I would do a quick blog on this and send you.

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  6. Kali is a Goddess of the tooth. I think Ashera would be considered a Goddess of the breast.

    I find it inconceivable that language evolved three separate times. Surely it evolved once and then radiated out quickly by selection. Therefore, perhaps aus (shining) and aish (fire) are from the same ancient root. The second part of the word (TR) could be "tsur" which means "stone" and is related to the word for "place or locality".

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  7. All sorts of things are possible in linguistic speculation. But I think you have moved out of the area where it is relevant to this blog entry and you are getting tied up in tangental side issues.

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  8. Really? OK, sorry. Back to the goddess...

    Kali, in her original form, could be both a goddess of the tooth AND of the breast (life and death). Much like Ereshkegal dies and comes back to life so that in her earliest form (whatever her name was) was both winter and spring - death and renewal. Perhaps her different aspects were divided much later. If the item in Ishtar's hand is a paasa or kala paasa, then it could also be attributed to life and rebirth. It is supposed to be used to free the soul from the body allowing the soul to move to wherever it is going. It reminds me more of a garrote than a noose. A garrote can be used for strangulation but can also be used to remove a thrown pot from a potter's wheel. An umbilical cord can be severed using a type of garrote. It can be gradually tightened to allow blood to clot before separation thereby lessening the likelihood of bleeding. An umbilical cord can also be a type of garrote that strangles a child before birth.

    If this is too off topic, just delete.

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  9. Im perfectly fine with morediscussions of the Goddess. In the case of the linguistic derivations of her name, we had started out on somewhat firm ground where we could make reasonable inferances. I requested that you stop at that point because we were digressing and getting away from something pretty tangible and concrete into a much more speculative area and that could go on and on forever without any way of checking the validity of the speculations. If we have something concrete to start with (such as assuming a certain PIE root from the onset, which was your original suggestion) we can suggest further Indo-European roots which seem to make sense within that context, and then suggest it got into the Semitic languages as a loan word. When we start using both IE and Semetic roots and suggest further possibilities and further meanings, the number of possibilities begin multiplying endlessly but have become at the same time both less meaningful and less certain. That is why I felt you were beginning to go too far afield. And yes Ishtar is also a death and rebirth Goddess: the confusion is in that one of her aspects is the death aspect and puts her life aspect to death...which begins to become confusing for more modern audiences. Your comments in this section are indeed pertinent. And Jayasree's comments above were also pertinent.

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  10. You are correct in that modern audiences are confused by the birth and death being the same Goddess. I think that is because modern humans are far removed from most natural processes. Without death there can be no life. All living organisms exist or existed because of the death of other organisms. Perhaps this is the reason the Goddess of the Tooth is a devourer. Plants need organic matter to grow. Animals, including humans kill and eat other animals. Sometimes the Goddess devours by burning. Burning quickly releases nutrients into the soil without waiting for decomposition. Fire is the tongue of Kali. We still refer to flames as "tongues" that "lick". I

    Hebrew Shadad is to "utterly destroy" which is built from the same root as Shahd (female breasts). Shaday is the Divine name in the form of nurturer (Exodus 6:3). Shade is a soul or spirit. Concepts of death and nurturing are from the same root word.

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