Deluge of Atlantis

Deluge of Atlantis
Deluge of Atlantis

Friday, November 11, 2011

Denisovian Genes And Transpacific Contact

Recently there was big news out of Central Asia about near-human DNA being uncovered that was not human and not Neanderthal, and the population came to be known as the Denisovians. The genetic difference between Denosovans and Neanderthals is about as great as between the most divergent types of modern men, and Denosovans are lacking a gene shared by Neanderthals, chimpanzees and most modern Homo sapiens, if I understand the documentation properly.

David Campbell, one of the regular readers on this blog, referred me to this website and asked if I had considered the information in relation to Sundaland:

http://johnhawks.net/weblog/reviews/denisova/skoglund-jakobsson-2011-south-china.html


And the first map shows that relic-Denisovian genes persist in the fringes of Indonesia and in Melanesia, but more substantially in New Guinea and Australia. The newer wave of Central Asian genetics seems to have replaced the older Denisovan populations in most of Indonesia: Negritos are also not Denisovans.


Now what is intensely interesting to me is that this later map seems to show TWO TransPacific genetic connections: one is a small but definite Denisovian presence in Northern South America and this did NOT come by way of Beringia or North America but directly across from East Asia and Australasia: and the second is that There is another population centered in Mexico, blocking the way to Northern South America, which corresponds to the genetic frequency of the Indus Valley, and this also did not come by way of Beringia but directly across the Pacific. I count this as a trace of the Tlatilco settlers mentioned in the article "Pretty Ladies and the Indus Script"
Best Wishes, Dale D.

3 comments:

  1. Could there be some sort of genetic predisposition to the ancient studies of the stars... Egypt, Indus vally, the Yucatan and legends of the Australian aborigines? How about connections to mid-Pacific islands... maybe even the Galapogos?

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  2. Actually, the Mexican point has less Denisovan ancestry than the "overall" American and even Sub-Saharan African admixture, it's cyan, between 0.524 and 0.523, while the green color indicates something above that.

    What I find somewhat interesting is that region near Mexico and California was also supposed to have some evidence of an earlier non-classical mongoloid colonization, seemingly australoid or negroid (I guess that prognathism is perhaps the main defining trait of this classification, alongside with dolychocephaly), just like South America, which also seems to have remnants of this earlier colonization, on Fuegians, Luzia (Brazil, the fossil specimen, not a locality), and also some Brazilian native-Americans seem to have Polynesian DNA. I don't know if these are related at all, I think it would be more parsimonious to suppose so, but in that case it's somewhat unexpected that there's that "cold spot" on North America, so near to where I'd expect a little "warmer" color, at least a yellowed-green.

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  3. There is some difference in the proportions between the different studies.In the case of the Mexican "Spot" my point was not so much that it was Denisovan than it was closer to the Indian/Indus area, which was what my point was indicating. And at the time, theoreticaslly "Polynesians" did not exist in the Pacific. As I pointed out elsewhere recently, the genetic factors in the New World indicated as being "Polynesian" before there were any Polynesians in the Pacific can only indicate "Kon-Tiki" rafting going out to Polynesia from South America later on.

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