Deluge of Atlantis

Deluge of Atlantis
Deluge of Atlantis

Saturday, March 5, 2011

Cultural Artefacts At The Bottom Of The Sea

History has also revealed that just as lands have emerged from the depths in that area, other land now under water was once above sea-level. One such piece of evidence was uncovered during the 1898 laying of a transatlantic cable (below). As during earlier attempts, the cable snapped and the workers were required to pull it to the surface for repairs. This incident occurred some 500 miles to the north of the Azores.

Whilst searching for the cable, the sea floor in the area was found to be composed of rough peaks, pinnacles and deep valleys, more reminiscent of land than the expected sea bottom. Grappling irons brought up rock specimens from a depth of 1700 fathoms. These rocks proved to be tachylyte – vitreous basaltic lava that cools above water under atmospheric pressure.

According to Pierre Termier, a French geologist who made a study of the incident, if the lava had solidified under water it would have been crystalline instead of vitreous.

Termier further surmised that the lava had been submerged under water soon after cooling, as evidenced by the relative sharpness of the material brought up. Although it cannot be ascertained exactly when this occurred, it was certainly within the last 15,000 years as lava decomposes in that time. Further evidence of more recent underwater activity comes from a discovery in 1923 when technicians from a Western Telegraph ship searching for a lost cable in the Atlantic detected that the rising ocean bed had thrown up the cable by 2.25 miles in only twenty-five years.

In 1949, Professor M Ewing of Columbia University was exploring the mid-Atlantic ridge. At a depth of between two and three and a half miles, he discovered pre-historic beach sand. This puzzled Ewing, as sand, being the product of erosion should be non-existent on the seabed. The conclusion reached was that either the land sank, or the ocean level was much lower in a past epoch.

There are other interesting finds. In the course of a submarine probe by the Geological Society of America in 1949, about a ton of limestone discs were lifted from the bed of the Atlantic, just south of the Azores Island chain. Their average size was about 6 inches with a thickness of 1.5 inches. The discs had a peculiar cavity in their centre. On the outside they were relatively smooth, but, in the cavities, they were rough. These ‘sea-biscuits’ as they were called, did not appear to be a natural formation and could not be identified. According to the Lamont Geological Observatory (Columbia University) "the state of lithification of the limestone suggests that it may have been lithified under subariel conditions and that the seamount may have been an island within the past 12,000 years."


Other claims that the Azores may have been the location of a lost civilisation were supported by alleged sightings in the area of underwater buildings and entire ‘cities’ made from aircraft as far back as 1942. These sightings first started when air ferry pilots flying from Brazil to Dakar glimpsed what appeared to be a submerged city on the western slope of mountains in the mid-Atlantic ridge.

......

Berlitz, Atlantis: The Eighth Continent

I came across the quote on an internet Atlantis message board and I thought it was worth re-posting. Zhirov mentions the "Sea Biscuits" and says they were artificially shaped stone dishes made when the Atlantis seamounts were subaerial: Jacques Costeau also felt that the top of the Great Meteor Tablemount further to the South of the Atlantis seamounts was also formerly above water owing to the erosional characteristics of the pebbles off of the seamount's top.

Berlitz elsewhere speaks of Pyramid-like structures recorded on sonar readings of the bottom near the Azores, and Otto Muck mentions a small section of copper chain dredged up from the bottom near the Azores as possible cultural remains.

All of which collectively is not much but it does give us something to go on.

Best Wishes, Dale D.

1 comment:

  1. I understand that "Sea biscuits" are echinoderms akin to sand dollars, but it seems that in this case we are not talking about shellfish but instead about pieces of limestone at about the same size and shape as the shellfish.

    ReplyDelete

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